Dissonance Of Surface 1. Caake – Body Wisdom Workshop Performance Tuesday 12th November 8pm

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Maggie Hannon, Dennis Golden, Deirdre Gillespie. Image Simon Alleyne

I wrote this blog after the one about Ockham’s Razor’s performance of This Time even though the performance came before and serendipitously (or not) I can see that some of the themes in my blog about This Time align with my thoughts about the CAAKE workshop performance.

Specifically the overlap is in the issues of age, rhythm, care and the removal of the end-gaining stress in the interactive movement.

Most of the performance was a trio by three experienced members of Echo Echo Dance Theatre Company’s long term project for movers over 50 years of age; Dennis Golden, Maggie Hannon and Deirdre Gillespie. They were joined briefly by the two artists who are in residence at St Augustine’s Old School House, Gail Mahon and Marketa Formanova.

Gail and Marketa had led a day long workshop with members of the Body Wisdom Group and those who wished to could choose to perform.

The piece focused on interactive relationships between the performers with typical trio compositional structures formed around duo-solo tensions, the processes by which duets form out of trios, and various ways that individuals roles changed. The clearly readable movement theme had to do with the compression and elasticity of space. The performance was a series of, more or less loose, improvisational scores played out as an exploration of this theme.

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Maggie Hannon, Dennis Golden, Deirdre Gillespie. Image Simon Alleyne

The simplicity and playfulness of the performance presence of Dennis, Deirdre and Maggie allowed the process of exploration to be interesting as a performance, with more than an experimental, analytic or abstract feel. There was humour, skill and pathos, and lots of small human stories, played out in both real and metaphoric time and space. Various pieces of equipment were used to make the physical connection between the performers extend into the performance space beyond close physical touch. Sticks like broomsticks, tubes and rope (with handles like a water ski rope) appeared creating three layers of dynamic interaction; literal physical touch, extended structural inter-dependency created by the leaning-in-pushes and leaning-out-pulls facilitated by the equipment and the forms of pull and push that exist in the spatial interactions between people not in physical touch contact, where the sense of pressure of pull and push, flow, resistance and turbulence are played out at a distance.

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Maggie Hannon, Dennis Golden, Deirdre Gillespie. Image Simon Alleyne

It was interesting to see how, because of the extension of physical contact at distance provided by the equipment, a lot of the connection at a distance became more intimate and immediately communicative than the non-touching movement in close proximity. The similar themes to those in This Time appeared because of the respect and care for the way in which the various structural inter-dependencies were managed by the performers during the explorations. Effectively what was happening, in part, was a series of challenges to shared physical organisation, not dissimilar to what happens in Contact Improvisation.

Very often when older people dance Contact Improvisation with younger people the rhythm is determined by the younger one with the older one always having to adapt from their natural, often well-organised, tempo to try to keep up with the reactivity and reflex speed of the younger one. In this case, all the trio of performers being over 50, the issue of speed and rhythm didn’t arise in the same way.

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Maggie Hannon, Dennis Golden, Deirdre Gillespie. Image Simon Alleyne

These performers are very competent movers. There is no sense of it being a problem to go down to sit, kneel or lie; no problem with standing up, balancing on one leg, changing direction. There is no collapse or rigidity in the movement or attention. However the natural range of tempo and tonus is, for sure, not that of a 25 year old. Because of the shared understanding of each other’s palettes of speed, tonus, acceleration, reactive speed etc there is no undue stress in the process of adaptation to each other’s movement choices. This means that the particular movement sophistication and understanding of the performers, specific to their age, had a chance to appear and be appreciated. There is nothing poetically limited about a particularly well organised movement down from standing into a kneel and then into sitting just because it takes a little time and has some very consciously organised, and attended to, stages. The knowledge of how to manage that journey with balance and dignity is a true and valuable knowledge. Going faster, and possibly being rushed and less well organised, would be inappropriate. Watching, we didn’t see insecurity, worry, rushing and badly organised end-gaining movement but rather were invited to a particular and well inhabited movement world.

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Maggie Hannon, Dennis Golden, Deirdre Gillespie. Image Simon Alleyne

 

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